2022 Health Equity Grants 

Vascular Cures Health Equity Grants are designed to fund collaborative 1-2 year projects that address inequity in vascular care and research. Two 2022 grants have been awarded to two teams of established clinician-scientists at leading academic medical centers and community health organizations 

The Collaborative Patient-Centered Research (CPCR) grant is designed to fill a critical funding gap by rewarding high-risk, collaborative science that prioritizes the patient perspective.
The new Vascular Health Impact Grant (VHIG) is designed to fill a critical funding gap by rewarding innovative and collaborative community-based initiatives.

CPCR Grant Project: 

Implementing Peer-Pal Intervention (PPI) in Low-income Patients with Ischemic Diabetic Foot Ulceration (DFU)    

Investigators: 

  • Emily Rosario, PhD — Director of Research at Casa Colina Hospital and Centers for Healthcare
  • Tze-Woei Tan, MD — Vascular Surgeon at University of Arizona
  • David G. Armstrong, DPM PhD — Podiatrist at USC and President of American Limb Preservation Society (ALPS)
  • Virginie Blanchette, DPM PhD — University of Quebec at Trois-Rivieres
  • Francisco N. – Patient advocate

PAD patients from low-income neighborhoods are at increased risk of developing a diabetic foot wound and leg amputation. Peer support can provide effective and culturally tailored social support and may improve the quality of life. The pilot project is testing whether patient-centered Peer-Pal Intervention (PPI) helps promote the care of low-income patients with vascular disease and diabetic foot ulcerations. 

Patients with peripheral artery disease from low-income neighborhoods are at increased risk of developing a diabetic foot wound and leg amputation. Foot and wound care is a significant challenge in low-income communities, and patients with foot ulcerations commonly experience emotional distress. Peer support can provide effective and culturally tailored social support and may improve the quality of life of low-income patients with diabetes. The pilot project is testing whether patient-centered Peer-Pal Intervention (PPI) helps promote care of low-income patients with vascular disease and diabetic foot ulcerations. 

VHIG Grant Project:

Early Recognition of PAD in High-Risk Communities of Color  

Investigators: 

  • Neva White, DNP, CRNP-BC, CDE–Executive Director of the Frazier Family Coalition for Stroke Education and Prevention
  • Kathleen Reeves, MD–Chair and Professor of Urban Bioethics and Population Science at Temple University

This project will address health disparities for amputation rates among Black men in Philadelphia by engaging the entire community, including patients, community organizations and providers. The team will develop a provider webinar series of virtual vascular education and a “train-the-trainer” course for providers to address early recognition of peripheral artery disease (PAD). In partnership with community organizations, there will be free screening events and community outreach to bolster greater understanding of PAD, including risk factors, warning signs, and resources. Emphasizing patient experience in the evaluative strategy, the project team will enlist the expertise and insight of patients with personal experience with lower extremity amputation and vascular complications to provide a real-time view and perspective. The project will have expansive impact on the number of screenings conducted, early identification, and subsequently, limb preservation. Imperative to preventing lower extremity amputations, training will be offered to more providers within the Jefferson and Temple Health networks, targeting existing interventions related to equity in vascular care.