2011 Gale Tang, MD, F.A.C.S.

gale_tang-resized2011 Wylie Scholar
Assistant Professor of  Vascular Surgery
University of Washington

The Wylie grant was awarded to support Dr. Tang's research in understanding the mechanisms that promote blood vessel growth, and to develop new non-surgical therapies for people suffering from an advanced form of peripheral artery disease (PAD).

As a vascular surgeon, Dr. Tang sees patients who have major blockages in the arteries of their legs resulting in loss of blood flow. Dr. Tang's research has focused on creating new vessels to carry the blood that blocked arteries can no longer transport by evaluating the syndecan-1 protein encoded by the SDC1 gene. 

More recently, Dr. Tang has shifted her research focus away from syndecan-1 to the role of p27 Kip1 in collateral artery development. "This is allowing me to take advantage of the synergy from Dr Clowes's and Dr Conte's work on the role of p27 in the response to arterial injury in humans," explains Dr. Tang. She also reports that "Since being awarded the Wylie Scholar award, and directly related to the work I have been able to achieve using the award funds, I have received $90,000 of competitive internal funding during the award tenure."

Dr. Tang is an excellent example of the synergy of Vascular Cures' programs made possible by generous donors. Prior to receiving the 2011 Wylie Scholar award, Dr. Tang studied mechanisms of blood vessel growth at the Laboratory for Accelerated Vascular Research (LAVR) from 2001-2003, and is currently working under the mentorship of Alec Clowes, MD, who was a leader of the Vascular Cures Research Network. LAVR was created at UCSF with grants from Vascular Cures and the Wayne and Gladys Valley Foundation.

Learn more about Gale Tang, MD F.A.C.S. or watch this video about her Wylie Scholar research.